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If You Build It, Will They Come? Consumer Behavior Concepts for Effective Marketing of Healthy Food

This webinar explores, at an introductory level, how one may adapt what we know about marketing and consumer behavior to create positive social change. The concepts are illustrated using inspiring examples of success and practical advice.

Oct 18, 2012

Description

Connecting all the dots to ensure a good supply of healthy food is challenging, particularity in underserved and limited resource populations. Creating access to Good Food alone does not necessarily guarantee community members will purchase and eat it. Increasing food access is good, but increasing the consumption of healthy food is even better.

To “close the deal” with the consumer, we must truly and respectfully understand several factors including, how people in the community live, the constraints they live with, and how they shop. This information, when handled in a sensitive and thoughtful way is critical to creating an effective healthy food marketplace that considers what products should be marketed, at what price and to which specific consumers.

This webinar explores, at an introductory level, how one may adapt what we know about marketing and consumer behavior to create positive social change. The concepts are illustrated using inspiring examples of success and practical advice.

Food Marketing Professor, Dr. Marty Meloche from St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, PA discusses how marketing activity can be thought of as a facilitation of ‘exchange.’  Given this framework, how do we effectively influence individuals to exchange their extremely limited resources for healthier alternatives? How do we make healthy alternatives a viable, even preferred, alternative for market segments with very limited resources? By illustrating the basics of food marketing, consumer behavior, and market segments, Dr. Meloche will begin our quest to effectively integrate social change and marketing for positive outcomes.

Program Manager, Michelle Frain Muldoon, Wallace Center, Healthy Urban Food Enterprise Development (HUFED) Program, further elaborates on food marketing and underserved consumers by sharing food marketing successes and failures from social enterprises across the country. HUFED, is a Wallace Center-led program that works in 16 states and DC piloting innovative business models in historically excluded and traditionally underserved communities. Michelle also discusses how to integrate the principles of community development and social marketing into business planning for sustainability of your business or desired outcome.

Community Activist and Public Health Specialist, Rubi Orozco, from Centro del Obrero/Mujer Obrera in El Paso, TX describes how they incorporate food marketing and a customer-centered approach into the design of their innovative and successful food hub and retail business. Rubi describes how their day-to-day operations and their business planning are simultaneously appropriate and respectful, meet the needs of their customers, and promote positive and incremental changes.

Recording 

Slides

Click here to download the slides (PDF)

Presenter Bios

Ashley Taylor

Ashley TaylorAshley Taylor is a program coordinator and administrator with more than five years of experience implementing and supporting domestic and international programs that serve diverse low-income and under-served populations and increase access to healthy, sustainable food. Ashley has a master’s dress in Sustainable Development Planning and Management, is certified in Village Development Permaculture, and has worked with small farmers in South Africa, Indonesia, and throughout the US.   Currently, as the Healthy Urban Food Enterprise Development (HUFED) Program Coordinator for the Wallace Center, she supports to 30 grantees across the United States and is actively researching best practices for food access, food enterprise development, regional food systems, and food value chains. 

Martin Meloche

Marin MelocheMarty Meloche has been a professor of food marketing for over 25 years, and is currently teaching at St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, PA. He earned his PhD in Marketing from the University of Kentucky, and is author and contributor to a large number of books and papers on marketing, business, and food marketing in particular. He is a frequent conference moderator/facilitator and speaker. He has earned numerous awards for excellence in teaching, and has committed himself to serving the betterment of society in several different roles, including board memberships, and international service. It is my honor to introduce Marty to you.

Michelle Frain Muldoon

Michelle Frain MuldoonMichelle Muldoon, a bi-racial, bi-cultural Asian American, is a Program Manager and Food Marketing Specialist with more than seventeen years of experience designing, improving, and running complex social change projects in some of the most impoverished and underserved parts of the United States and Africa. Her skills and experience span Social Change; Social Marketing; Health, Diet, and Nutrition for Healthy Food Marketing; Food Systems & Regional Economies; Working with People of Color and Historically Disadvantaged groups; and many more areas. Muldoon created a self-sustaining business skills training center that still functions today, in Togo, West Africa; she was a marketing educator to U.S. family farmers, working at Rodale Institute. Michelle currently manages the Healthy Urban Food Enterprise Development (HUFED) Center at the Wallace Center.

Rubi Orozco

Rubi OrozcoRubi Orozco, MPH, is a bilingual, bicultural health educator who earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Health Science from the University of Texas at El Paso, and a Master’s Degree in Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley. She planned and implemented statewide health education activities for the Environmental Health Investigations Branch of the California Department of Public Health. She assisted in a assessment of service needs among monolingual Spanish-speaking immigrants in the San Francisco Bay area and an assessment of food security and health status of farm worker families in the U.S.-Mexico border. Her experience includes needs assessments and curriculum development and implementation. Her passion continues to be learning, documenting, and practicing ancestral approaches to health promotion. In her position as Public Health Specialist with La Mujer Obrera, she spearheads the Mayapan Nutrition Education Project, a model program that ties increased local food access to culturally based nutrition education.

 
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